QR Code Exposition

That light and happy feeling that only a late summer’s day can convey; the joy of a luminous and warm landscape before us; a meditative moment while we are admiring an intense sunset, with its colorful shades; a whirlwind of emotions that in restfulness finds its most powerful peace.

Shakespeare’s words of the sonnet Shall a compare thee to a summer’s day? are the fabric on which this dreamy, and online-only, exhibition is conceived. Featuring artworks by Gayle Chong Kwan, Marie Denis, Igor Eškinja, Marcos Lutyens and Michelangelo Penso, the group show deals with warm sensations and light feelings, shared love, endless beauty and the value of meditative time.

In the belief that art, like poetry, can convey beauty and emotions in a unique way, this exhibition aims at lightening our hearts and hopes, and encouraging us to enter into a peaceful and contemplative universe, guided by Shakespeare’s visual words.

Courtesy Alberta Pane Gallery (Paris, Venice) and the artist
Marie Denis, Le divan, 1993, analogical color photography, 30 x 41 cm
Le divan
Marie Denis
1993
"Whether it is to magnify what she borrowed from her direct environment, or to point out its contradictions or faults, Marie Denis' work is vigorously predatory; but she always restores a daily life that we weren't able to see, after passing it through the filter of her work: she gives it meaning. And therein lies her generosity". Catherine Brice
Photographie
Courtesy Alberta Pane Gallery (Paris, Venice) and the artist
Marie Denis, L'herbier estampe, 2019, Engravings and vegetal elements on board, variable dimensions
L'herbier estampe
Marie Denis
2019
Installation
Courtesy Alberta Pane Gallery (Paris, Venice) and the artist
Marcos Lutyens, Pulled, 2014, enamel, iron filings, graphite on Yupo paper, 60 x 60 cm
Pulled
Marcos Lutyens
2014
A series of two-dimensional works records the cadence of the pull notifications of the Twitter App: as each pull is added to the rotating surface, turning with time as a rotating clock, a series of networks and associations is formed responding to the sequence that bombards the cell phone, and by extension ourselves.
Dessin
Courtesy Alberta Pane Gallery (Paris, Venice) and the artist
Gayle Chong Kwan, Les précieuses, 2008, c-type photographic print, variable dimensions
Les précieuses
Gayle Chong Kwan
2008
Photographie
Gayle Chong Kwan, Blind Vistas, 2013, tactile photographs
Blind vistas
Gayle Chong Kwan
2013
The moon becomes a metaphor for the blind vision. It is an island territory, devoid of all human presence, confronted with infertile seas seen from the shores of the Earth from hundreds and thousands of kilometers. And G. Chong Kwan likes islands: she turns them into non-places that are not found on any maps; dark and strange territories. She is interested in the mechanisms that create illusions and parallel worlds, to make us observe a magical world, speechless and forgetting the distance that separated us from it, with the strong will to believe it, to be fooled by a dream's deception.
Installation
Courtesy Alberta Pane Gallery (Paris, Venice) and the artist
Michelangelo Penso, Exosquellette, 2014, rubber, aluminium, 120 x 30 x 30 cm
Exosquellette
Michelangelo Penso
2014
“My works are always inspired by the scientific-biological research. Indeed, they represent microscopic exoskeletons of bacteria. We all have an internal skeleton, instead in micro-dimension many of these beings have an external skeleton, they are like cartilage. My artworks are inspired by this aspect and they are made of rubber, therefore, they are themselves highly deformable, even once they have been made. In fact, in nature these exoskeletons can warp in their living environment, in movement, when floating in the voids, in all this micro-dimension”. Michelangelo Penso, 2015
Sculpture
Courtesy Alberta Pane Gallery (Paris, Venice) and the artist
Igor Eskinja, Golden Fingers of Louvre, 2017, archival print on aluminium, 30 x 40 cm
Golden Fingers of Louvre
Igor Eškinja
2017
In his research Igor Eškinja merges different visual planes, creating stratifications that lend themselves to multiple levels of reading. The 'Golden Fingers of Louvre' series exposed overlaps the imaginative value of the French museum with the almost baroque pictorial detail of the imprints left by visitors. The marks of the hands are thus material elements that disorient the viewer, who is stimulated to direct his interpretation elsewhere, towards the visual abstraction or a possible Institutional Critique.
Photographie