Armory Show

1913 : l’exposition organisée par l’Association des Peintres et Sculpteurs Américains du 17 février au 15 mars 1913 à New-York signe un tournant dans ce que l’on pourrait définir comme le « centre de l’art » : d’Européen l’art s’implante sur le nouveau continent pour entériner la prédominance américaine à la fin du second conflit mondial. Des oeuvres impressionnistes, fauvistes et cubistes y sont présentées mais c’est surtout le travail de Marcel Duchamp avec la présentation de Nu descendant un escalier qui bouleverse l’opinion et défraie la chronique. Largement décriée par la critique, cette exposition a connu un tel succès qu’elle est devenue une des expositions les plus mythiques de l’Histoire de l’Art. Du reste, les chiffres parlent d'eux-mêmes : 4000 personnes invitées à l'inauguration ; pas moins de 1600 oeurvres et 10 000 à 12 000 visiteurs rien que pour le dernier jour de l'exposition.

Armory Show, 1913.
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Armory Show, 1913
Salle H, Armory Show, 1913

Principales expositions: 

Armory Show, 17 février au 15 mars 1913, 68 Lexington Avenue, New York.

Textes fondateurs: 

Catalogue de l'exposition
Page 1 NEW YORK 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art Association of American Painters and Sculptors, Inc. February Seventeenth to March Fifteenth Catalogue 25 Cents ————— Page 7 International Exhibition of Modern Art NEW YORK 1913 ————— Page 12 PREFACE Mr. Arthur B. Davies, President of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors, gave out the following statement on the last day of December, 1912: "On behalf of the Executive Committee, I desire to explain the general attitude of the Association and especially in regard to the International Exhibition to be held in this city in February and March. "This is not an institution but an association. It is composed of persons of varying tastes and predilections, who are agreed on one thing, that the time has arrived for giving the public here the opportunity to see for themselves the results of new influences at work in other countries in an art way. "In getting together the works of the European Moderns, the Society has embarked on no propaganda. It proposes to enter on no controversy with any institution. Its sole object is to put the paintings, sculptures, and so on, on exhibition so that the intelligent may judge for themselves by themselves. "Of course controversies will arise, just as they have arisen under similar circumstances in France, Italy, Germany and England. But they will not be the result of any stand taken by this Association as such; on the other hand we are perfectly willing to assume full responsibility for providing the opportunity to those who may take one side or the other. ————— Page 13 « Any individual expression of opinion contrary to the above is at variance with the official resolutions of this Association." The wide publicity given to the above in the public press all over the country showed to what an extent it was accepted as a definite and precise expression of the policy and the aims of the Association in its relation to the art of Europe and to the American public. That policy and those aims remain unchanged. Anything that can be said further must be but an amplification of the statement. The foreign paintings and sculptures here shown are regarded by the committee of the Association as expressive of the forces which have been at work abroad of late, forces which cannot be ignored because they have had results. The American artists exhibiting here, consider the exhibition as of equal importance for themselves as for the lay public. The less they find their work showing signs of the developments indicated in the Europeans, the more reason they will have to consider whether or not painters and sculptors ————— Page 14 here have fallen behind through escaping the incidence through distance and for other reasons of the forces that have manifested themselves on the other side of the Atlantic. Art is a sign of life. There can be no life without change, as there can be no development without change. To be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar, is to be afraid of life. And to be afraid of life is to be afraid of truth, and to be a champion of superstition. This exhibition is an indication that the Association of American Painters and Sculptors is against cowardice even when it takes the form of amiable self satisfaction. FREDERICK JAMES GREGG.

Artistes associés: 

Albert Abensschein, Robert Ingersoll Aitken, John J. Alger, Karl Anderson, Alexander Archipenko, Edwin Marion Ashe, Florence Howell Barclay, George Grey Barnard, Chester Beach, Gifford Beal, Maurice Becker, Wladimir von Bechtejeff, Marion H. Beckett, George Bellows, H. Berlin, Joseph Bernard, Nelson N. Bickford, Karl Bitter, Olaf Bjorkman, Alexandre Blanchet, Guy Pène du Bois, Oscar Bluemner, Hans Bolz, Pierre Bonnard, Gutzon Borglum, Homer Boss, Antoine Bourdelle, Constantin Brancusi, Georges Braque, Bessie Marsh Brewer, D. Putman Brinley, Bolton Brown, Fannie Miller Brown, Patrick Henry Bruce, Mrs Bryson Burroughs, Paul Burlin, Charles Camoin, Arthur Beecher Carles, Myra Musselman Carr, Oscar E. Casare, Athos Casarini, Mary Cassatt, Paul Cézanne, Auguste Chabaud, O.E. Chaffe, Robert W. Chanler, Emilie Charmy, Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Amos Chew, Alfred Vance Churchill, Gustave Cimiotti, Edwin Swift Clymer, Harry W. Coate, Nessa Cohen, Glenn O. Coleman, Howard Coluzzi, Charles Conder, Camille Corot, Kate Cory, Gustave Courbet, Arthur Crisp, Henri-Edmond Cross, Herbert Crowley, Carl Gordon Cutler, Leon Dabo, Andrew Dasburg, Honoré Daumier, Randall Davey, Jo Davidson, Stuart Davis, Arthur B. Davies, Perrine Van Dearing, Edgar Degas, Eugène Delacroix, Robert Delaunay, Maurice Denis, André Derain, Edith Dimock, Rudolph Dirks, Ruger Donoho, Henri Doucet, Katherine S. Dreier, Aileen Dresser, Laurence Tyler Dresser, Florence Dreyfous, Marcel Duchamp, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Raoul Dufy, Richard H. Dufy, Georges Leon Dufrenoy, André Dunoyer de Segonzac, Abastenia Eberle, Henry B. Eddy, Jean Eels, Amos W. Engle, Jacob Epstein, Florence Este, Lily Everett, Jules Flandrin, Mary Foote, James Earle Fraser, Kenneth Frazier, Roger de La Fresnaye, Arthur Ernest Freund, Othon Friesz, Sherry Edmunson Fry, Ernest Fuhr, Paul Gauguin, Samuel Wood Gaylor, Phelan Gibb, Wilhelm Gimmi, Pierre Girieud, William Glackens, Albert Gleizes, Henry I. Glintenkamp, Vincent van Gogh, Anne Goldhwaite, Francisco Goya, Charles Guérin, Bernard Gussow, Bernhard Gutmann, Philip L. Hale, Samuel Halpert, Charles R. Harley, Marsden Hartley, Childe Hassam, Edith Haworth, Walter Helbig, Robert Henri, Julius Hess, Eugene Higgins, Margaret Hoard, Ferdinand Hodler, Nathaniel Hone, Charles Hopkinson, Edward Hopper, Cecil Howard, Albert Humphreys, Mrs Thomas Hunt, Margaret Wendell Huntington, Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, James Dickson Innes, F. M. Jansen, Augustus E. John, Gwen John, Grace Mott Johnson, Julius Paul Junghanns, Wassily Kandinsky, Bernard Karfiol, Henry G. Keller, Edith L. King, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Adolph Kleiminger, Hermine E. Kleinert, Edward Adam Kramer, Leon Kroll, Walt Kuhn, Gaston Lachaise, Pierre Laprade, Marie Laurencin, Ernest Lawson, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Arthur Lee, Derwent Lees, Fernand Léger, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Rudolph Levy, Jonas Lie, Amy Londoner, George B. Luks, A.F. Lundberg, Dodge Macknight, Elmer Livingston MacRae, Gus Mager, Aristide Maillol, Édouard Manet, Henri Manguin, Edward Middleton Manigault, Manolo (Manuel Hugué), John Marin, Matthew Maris, Albert Marquet, Jacqueline Marval, Carolyn C. Mase, Henri Matisse, Alfred Henry Maurer, Max Mayrshofer, Francis McComas, Kathleen McEnery, Howard McLane, Hower MacLean, Charlotte Meltzer, Oscar Miestchaninoff, Kenneth Hayes Miller, David B. Milne, Claude Monet, Adolphe Monticelli, John Mowbray-Clarke, Henry Muhrmann, Edward Munch, Herman Dudley Murphy, Ethel Myers, Jerome Myers, Elie Nadelman, Frank A. Nankivell, Helen J. Niles, Olga Oppenheimer, Marjorie Organ, Walter Pach, Josephine Paddock, Jules Pascin, Agnes Pelton, Charles H. Pepper, Harriet Sophia Phillips, Francis Picabia, Pablo Picasso, Pietro, Camille Pissarro, Walter K. Pleuthner, Louise Pope, Louis Potter, T. E. Powers, Maurice Prendergast, James Preston, May Wilson Preston, James Pryde, Arthur Putnam, Bertrand Rasmussen, Odilon Redon, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henry Reuterdahl, Catherine N. Rhoades, William Rimmer, Boardman Robinson, Theodore Robinson, Auguste Rodin, Mary C. Rogers, Paul Rohland, Jules Edouard Roiné, Edward F. Rook, Georges Rouault, Henri Rousseau, Ker-Xavier Roussel, Charles C. Rumsey, George W. Russell, Morgan Russell, Albert Pinkham Ryder, William E. Schumacher, Charles Serret, Georges Seurat, Julius Seyler, Charles H. Shannon, Sidney Dale Shaw, Charles Sheeler, Walter Sickert, Paul Signac, Alfred Sisley, Max Slevogt, John Sloan, Amadéo de Sousa-Cardozo, Carl Sprinchorn, Philip Wilson Steer, Joseph Stella, Morgan Stinemetz, Nicolas Tarkhoff, Henry Fitch Taylor, William L. Taylor, Felix E. Tobeen, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaston Toussaint, Allen Tucker, Alden Twachtman John Henry Twachtman, Félix Vallotton, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Jacques Villon, Maurice de Vlaminck, Bessie Potter Vonnoh, Édouard Vuillard, Abraham Walkowitz, F. M. Walts, Hilda Ward, Alexander L. Warshawsky, F. William Weber, E. Ambrose Webster, Friedrich August Weinzheimer, J. Alden Weir, Albert Weisgerber, Julius Wentscher, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Charles Henry White, Claggett Wilson, Leon Wolf, Denys Wortman Jr, Enid Yandell, Jack B. Yeats, Arthur Young, William Zorach, Mahonri Young, Eugene Zak, Marguerite Zorach, William Zorach.

Artistes à rapprocher: 

William James Glackens, Robert Henri, Walt Kuhn, George Luks, Elmer Livingston MacRae, Jerome Myers, Everett Shinn, John French Sloan, Alfred Stieglitz, Henry Fitch Taylor.

Courant, mouvement, lieu à rapprocher: 

Ash Can School, Association of American Painters and Sculptors